In March, due to a natural phenomenon, temperature, wind and sun cause the ice crust to crack and form beautiful turquoise blocks or ice hummocks on the surface of Lake Baikal in Siberia.
Photographer: X

In March, due to a natural phenomenon, temperature, wind and sun cause the ice crust to crack and form beautiful turquoise blocks or ice hummocks on the surface of Lake Baikal in Siberia.

Photographer: X

stuffwhitepeopleask:

herxdbh:

This is a video where muslim youtubers Adam Saleh and Sheikh Akbar test what will happen if they have an argument in western clothes vs having an argument in their traditional clothes. The first argument is fine. Nothing happens. But as you can see, the minute they have an argument with their traditional clothes, the police officer stops them and searches them. This shows the prejudice of police officers. It shows how racist they are.

"Why are you dressed like this."

this is why its offensive when white people wear middle eastern or southeast asian cultural garb for exotic uniqueness. It literally changes everyone’s perception of us and makes our lives more dangerous. 

nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info
nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info
nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info
nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info
nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info
nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info
nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info
nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 
though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere. 
when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.
photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin
Zoom Info

nubbsgalore:

known informally as asperatus clouds, this atmospheric phenomenon gets its name from the latin aspero, which roman poets used to describe the sea as it was roughened by the cold north wind. 

though the cause of their formation remains unknown, it is likely that the undulating and lumpy underside is a result of warmer, moister air from above and colder, dryer air from below meeting at the boundary between the lower and middle atmosphere.

when high level wind passes over rolling terrain, you get the same wavy effect as on the surface of water. but despite their ominous appearance, asperatus clouds tend to dissipate without a storm forming.

photos by (click pic) ken prior and allan gathman in perthshire, scotland; bryan and cherry alexander in qaanaaq, greenland; ti cranium in ohio; robert lurie in cape town, south africa; witta priester in new zealand; jesse klein in wisconsin

"MHC rowing" started following me on instagram? I mean damn i knew i was p gay but being mistaken as a member of the crew team is a whole new honor


Kodamas (木霊): are mythical spirits of Japan, inhabitants of the thick woods. They usually have a human appearance and each individual is unique in appearance and personality. It is said that can occur in non-human forms, and can appear as beautiful or terrible as they wish. Most cases appear to have an adorable look.

Kodamas (木霊): are mythical spirits of Japan, inhabitants of the thick woods. They usually have a human appearance and each individual is unique in appearance and personality. It is said that can occur in non-human forms, and can appear as beautiful or terrible as they wish. Most cases appear to have an adorable look.